Friday, February 18, 2011

Cinco Villas : Aragon (Spain)

Cinco Villas is one Aragonese comarca neighbouring Navarre in the West to which it had long belonged before the emergence of Aragon as a central Pyrenean power. Indeed, like its Navarrese neighbour, the area was populated by the Vascones, one of the many ancient Basque-speaking tribes of the area. This ancient Basque past still can be infered from the archaic placenames found in Cinco Villas : Ardisa, Isuerre, Ejea, Undués, Urriés, ... The local Aragonese language has been lost in most villages.





  • Sample :

Full scale



  • Brief anthropological analysis :

- Type 1 : Intermediate complexion (from blonde to dark hair, grey/black eyes, rather pale skin on average, ...), leptomorphic, long face (particularly on males), long and convex nose rather parallel to the face, close-set eyes, pointy chin, large jaw
~ Dinaricized Atlanto-Mediterranean




These individuals seem to show obvious Basque-related features (a convex nose, a triangular face, high cheekbones, ...) while other individuals are more generic though still in the dinaromorphic spectrum as far as I can tell. Lighter and more robust individuals can be found : they are quite typical from Pyrenean variability and can be found from the Basque Country to Pyrenean Catalonia.






- Type 2 : Intermediate complexion, more or less leptomorphic, straight/convex nose that can get broad, large jaw, wide-set eyes
~ Dinaromorphic Alpino-Mediterranean






Those broader-faced types can be classically analyzed as lightly more brachymorphic variants of the first type - as I did in other samples for instance - though some specific features include a very large jaw, eyes that get distant, a rather large nose yet still convex, ... : they might constitute a fair approximation of an average Aragonese type.

Some clearly brachymorphic individuals (a broad and little nose, a bulbous forehead, ...) somehow diverge from the Pyrenean standard (even though this type is not absent from Basque lands for instance).




  • Morphotypes finaux / Final morphotypes :

7 comments:

  1. I would say that the "Vascoid" typology dominates quite massively but that there is a trend towards "Iberoid" (more Mediterranean) shades (not really full distinct types in most cases) that I'd say characteristic of the Ebro basin probably in a clinal manner.

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  2. Yeah, that's it.

    I can add that Basque was still spoken during the XVIII century in the North of Cinco Villas. Some towns had specific names in Basque. For example Sos was known as Suesa in Roncalese.

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  3. I agree with Maju : I had that feeling that this area clearly is dominated by Vascoid types which somehow show an interesting trend towards more mainstream Iberian types.

    I'll soon upload new and more precise samples I made in the whole area : one in the Navarrese Ribera, some other ones in La Rioja. I've yet to properly sample Jacetania (I fear I'll have to use pics from folk festivals : as a consequence, I won't be able to check surnames but I don't think Ansotanos wearing regional costumes are that mixed).

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  4. We Spaniards are known as the southern Germans! Germans should thank us for giving them their speech :-)
    ¡Que viva España!

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  5. If you take Ansotanos in typical costumes, it is clearly ok in the sense they are not "tourists". However, Ansotanos might be only representative of Ansó or more exactly Ansó/Aragüés/Echo (same dialect of Aragonese). I am not so sure of these two valleys being representative of Sobrepuerto/Tena nor Jaca.

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  6. Spain??? I thought we were talking about Sweden...! Spaniards are the lighter humans in the whole universe: they look like termites larvae! Very very baskid...

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  7. Anonymous, I agree with you, but I wonder: are spaniard LIGHT TERMITES rather alpinoids than than nordid-mediterranean? How could I recognize them...? By their pointy chin, or convex nose maybe? Or their aqua-blue eyes?? Moreover: are they rather wood-eating than Paella-eating? Are they Basque speaking?????? Please, don't not keep me in suspense!
    :-DDDDD

    ReplyDelete

I've chosen to let people comment freely on my posts. Nevertheless, you'll lose your time taunting me and calling me a fascist (which I'm really not) : I pray you to read my introduction which will reassure that my intentions genuinely aim at achieving amateurish knowledge. I understand that you may not share my passion for the history of the peopling of the World, just don't let me know as clear conscience gained by bashing a humble documentary work is useless.